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You’ve been asked to find some games for your team’s next offsite.

Here are 5 that might work. You’ll find a download of more games (with more explanation) here.

When you need a professional facilitator to make an offsite work even better, contact me.

The 5 offsite games options here are:

  • Stretch
  • Patty cake in a circle
  • Rhyme and Associate
  • Do you like your neighbour
  • Wordy sharing game.

There’s more about each offsite game below.

Stretch

Stretch your body. Any bits are good, but you may consider at least hamstrings, shoulder ups and downs and rounds, side stretch: if you are adventurous, play a gentle game of wash the dishes, dry the dishes, and turn the dishes over. Always begin with a caution to only stretch as much as your body can do, it’s not about a competition but about icebreaking / loosening up.

If you want to make it more interactive then do a “Stretch and Share”. Ask each person to demonstrate/guide the circle through a stretch while telling a factoid, win of the week or aspiration.

Patty cake in a circle

Everyone in a circle

  1. right hand up, left hand down clap with both neighbours
  2. right hand down, left hand up slap with neighbours (the hands are just the other way round)
  3. clap

It helps to count or beat a rhythm.

To make it easier or harder, you can make the size of the circle anything from 2 – 50

The thing with these physical games is that people will get it wrong – it’s not about getting it right it’s about getting it right for as long as you can, and then laughing when you get it wrong (accepting failure gracefully and getting back in there).

Rhyme and associate

Rhyme and associate in a circle: First person says a word (dog).

Second person rhymes with that (hog), and then associates with the word they just said (pig).

Next person rhymes (big) and associates (tall), etc round and round.

Can try with just word association if you prefer, but people will tend to “prepare” rather than respond.

Do you like your neighbour

Everyone in a circle, one person in the middle.

Middle person goes to someone in the circle (A) and asks “do you like your neighbour?”

If A says “yes”, then the people on either side of A have to change places in the circle. If the middle person can get to the place before the others do, then there’s a new person in the middle.

If A says “no”, then A has to follow with “but I do like people who….” A’s aim is to make as many people move as they can; think of this as a demographic finder. While A could say “people wearing socks”, it may be more interesting to say “people who like red wine” or “People with no middle name” or “people who were confirmed”….

At this point whatever demographic A describes has to change places. Last person to find a place on the circle is the new middle person.

To make it more fun: add complications like when someone changes places they can’t change with the person next to them (or go back to their own spot); add a noise as they change places.

Remember that it’s about fun – about celebrating being the odd one out as much as being part of the group.

Wordy sharing game

There are plenty of wordy sharing games. Try:

  • Share an unknown fact about you (in 1:1 chat then bigger group)
  • Talk about a time when you were really excited, inspired or <insert name of positive emotion here>
  • Bring an object that’s important to you and explain why (1:1) multiple times. Either then share with larger groups.
  • Mixer bingo (you need to prepare this – a grid of things like “parents born overseas”, or “likes olives”) where they get people’s signatures in each of the squares).

Let me know which ones work out best.

More offsite games and ideas for making your offsite work:

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